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Umayya ibn Abd Shams

Umayya ibn Abd Shams was the son of Abd Shams and is the progenitor of the line of the Umayyad Caliphs. Anti-Umayyad polemic says that his name is derived from afa, a diminutive of the word for slave-girl and instead of being the legitimate son o ...

Umm Ubays

Umm Umais, Umm Ubais or Umm Ubays was a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. She was a slave in Mecca who became an early convert to Islam. After 614 she was tortured in an attempt to force her to renounce her faith. Abu Bakr bought and man ...

Arwa bint Kurayz

Arwa bint Kurayz was the mother of Uthman ibn Affan, a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, and the third of the Rashidun or "Rightly Guided Caliphs".

Seventh-day Adventist Church Pioneers

The Seventh-day Adventist Church pioneers were members of Seventh-day Adventist Church, part of the group of Millerites, who came together after the Great Disappointment across the United States and formed the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In 186 ...

Teachings of Ellen G. White

Ellen G. White, one of the co-founders of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, has been extremely influential on the church, which considers her a prophet, understood today as an expression of the New Testament spiritual gift of prophecy. She was a ...

Fishers Tale

The bands name is captured in the title of the debut album: "Why didnt you tell me. the fishers tale?". The "fisher" referred to the fisherman Peter, telling a tale of what happened in the early first century CE. The original band had an a cappel ...

Gao Rongrong

Gao Rongrong was an accountant at an art college in Shenyang, China. She was dismissed in 1999 for practicing Falun Gong. Gao was reportedly sent to the Longshan Forced Labor Camp in July 2003. Gao was allegedly tortured for six to seven hours. I ...

Death of Yu Zhou

Yu Zhou was a Chinese folk musician and Falun Gong practitioner who died in police custody in February 2008, at the age of 42. Ten days before his death, traffic police stopped the professional musician in Beijing, allegedly for speeding on the w ...

Executive Minister of the Iglesia ni Cristo

The Executive Minister of the Iglesia ni Cristo is the primary leader of the Philippine-based Christian denomination, the Iglesia ni Cristo. There has been three Executive Ministers of the church since the Iglesias founding in 1914 and all of the ...

Okot Odhiambo

Okot Odhiambo was a senior leader of the Lords Resistance Army, a Ugandan rebel group which operates from Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Odhiambo was one of five people for whom the International Criminal Court iss ...

Mandali (Meher Baba)

Mandali are considered to include those close disciples that lived permanently for extended periods with Meher Baba at his ashrams. However, not all of Meher Babas mandali lived with him. According to Meher Baba the Avatar always has 10 concentri ...

List of Unification movement people

The family of Rev. Moon and his wife Hak Ja Han are known as the "True Family". Rev. and Mrs. Moon are known as "True Father" and "True Mother" within the movement, and collectively as the "True Parents." Their children are known as the "True Chi ...

Shabda Kahn

Shabda Kahn serves as Pir of the Sufi Ruhaniat International, a branch within the spiritual lineage of Pir-o-Murshid Hazrat Inayat Khan. He is also a teacher and performer of Hindustani classical vocal music, Raga, in the Kirana Gharana style, se ...

St Mary the Virgin, Mortlake

St Mary the Virgin, Mortlake is a parish church in Mortlake, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is part of the Church of England and the Anglican Communion. The rector is The Revd Canon Dr Ann Nickson. The building, on Mortlake Hig ...

Tezcacohuatzin

Tezcacohuatzin was a king of Cuauhnahuac. He ruled in the late fourteenth century and was a grandfather of Aztec Emperor Moctezuma I and his wife, Chichimecacihuatzin I.

Jean-Claude Flornoy

Jean-Claude Flornoy was a French specialist of the Tarot of Marseille, a writer and card maker working on bringing back to life historical Tarot decks. He especially worked on restoring the Jean Noblet and Jean Dodal decks.

Acindynus (Carrhae)

Acindynus was a Byzantine governor of Carrhae, active in the reign of Emperor Maurice. He was accused of being a pagan and was executed. The main sources about him are Syriac chronicles, in particular the Chronicle of Michael the Syrian and the C ...

Fabius Aconius Catullinus Philomathius

Fabius Aconius was the son of Aconius Catullinus, Proconsul of Africa in 317-318, and had a daughter, Aconia Fabia Paulina, who married the influential pagan senator Vettius Agorius Praetextatus. He held the offices of Consul suffectus, Praeses o ...

Aedesia

Aedesia was a female philosopher of the Neoplatonic school who lived in Alexandria in the fifth century AD. She was a relation of Syrianus and the wife of Hermias, and was equally celebrated for her beauty and her virtues. After the death of her ...

Anatolius (Osroene)

Anatolius was a Byzantine official, active in the reign of Tiberius II Constantine. He was a topoteretes of the praetorian prefecture of the East and praeses of Osroene. He was accused of being a crypto-pagan and consequently executed.

Asclepigenia

Asclepigenia studied and taught, alongside her brother Hiero, at the Neoplatonic school of Athens. The school contended with the more scientific school in Alexandria. LIke other Neoplatonists of the time, she mainly studied Aristotle and Plato, b ...

Priscus Attalus

Priscus Attalus was twice Roman usurper, against Emperor Honorius, with Visigothic support. He was the last non-Christian Roman emperor. Priscus Attalus was a Greek from Asia whose father had moved to Italy under Valentinian I. Attalus was an imp ...

Clearchus (consul 384)

Born into a moderately successful family in the region of Thesprotia, as a boy Clearchus was taught by the philosopher and sophist Nicoles. Moving to Constantinople, in 356 or perhaps 357 he visited Antioch, and throughout this period until 363 h ...

Eunapius

Eunapius was a Greek sophist and historian of the 4th century AD. His principal surviving work is the Lives of Philosophers and Sophists, a collection of the biographies of 23 philosophers and sophists.

Eutolmius Tatianus

Tatians fall was caused by his conflict with the powerful general and politician Rufinus. Rufinus, consul in 392, feared the power of Tatianus and his son Proculus, as the two of them held both the Praetorian prefecture of the East and the urban ...

Macrobius

Macrobius, fully Macrobius Ambrosius Theodosius, also known as Theodosius, was a Roman provincial who lived during the early fifth century, at the transition of the Roman to the Byzantine Empire, and when Latin was as widespread as Greek among th ...

Messius Phoebus Severus

Born in Rome, he studied at the school of the neoplatonist philosopher Proclus, in Alexandria; among the other students there were the Pagan poet Pamprepius who was instrumental in the revolt of Illus, the military officer Marcellinus later semi- ...

Rutilius Claudius Namatianus

Rutilius Claudius Namatianus was a Roman Imperial poet, notable as the author of a Latin poem, De reditu suo, in elegiac metre, describing a coastal voyage from Rome to Gaul in 416. The solid literary quality of the work, and the flashes of light ...

Nicomachus Flavianus (son)

For his father with the same name, see Virius Nicomachus Flavianus Nicomachus Flavianus, sometimes referred to as Flavianus the Younger, was a grammarian and a politician of the Roman Empire. He was the son of Virius Nicomachus Flavianus. He held ...

Olympiodorus the Elder

Olympiodorus the Elder was a 5th-century neoplatonist who taught in Alexandria, then part of the Byzantine Empire. He is most famous for being the teacher of the important Neoplatonist Proclus, whom Olympiodorus wanted his own daughter to marry. ...

Praxagoras of Athens

Praxagoras of Athens was a pagan historian in the early 4th century AD. He was born in Athens and wrote three historical works, which are all lost: a history of the Kings of Athens, a history of Alexander the Great, and a panegyric biography of t ...

Sallustius

Sallustius or Sallust was a 4th-century writer, a friend of the Roman Emperor Julian. He wrote the treatise On the Gods and the Cosmos, a kind of catechism of 4th-century Hellenic paganism. Sallustius work owes much to that of Iamblichus of Chalc ...

Quintus Fabius Memmius Symmachus

He was son of the orator and politician Quintus Aurelius Symmachus and of Rusticiana; he was born in 383/384. Memmius had an elder sister, Galla, who married Nicomachus Flavianus, son of Virius Nicomachus Flavianus. At the age of ten, he became q ...

Zosimus

Zosimus was a Greek historian who lived in Constantinople during the reign of the Eastern Roman Emperor Anastasius I. According to Photius, he was a comes, and held the office of "advocate" of the imperial treasury. Zosimus was also known for con ...

Bjorn at Haugi

Bjorn at Haugi, Bjorn på Håga, Bjorn II or Bern was, according to Hervarar saga, a Swedish king and the son of Erik Bjornsson, and Bjorn ruled together in diarchy with his brother Anund Uppsale.

Hagrold

Hagrold, also known as Hagroldus, Harold, and Harald, was a powerful tenth-century Viking chieftain who ruled Bayeux. He was apparently a pagan from Scandinavia, and seems to have seized power in Normandy at about the time of the death of William ...

Porga of Croatia

Early scholars like Henry Hoyle Howorth believed that Porga was the son of one of five brothers who had left White Croatia. They noted that the name was uncommon and probably not of Slavic origin. Czech historian Pavel Jozef Safarik compared the ...

Siemomysl

Siemomysl or Ziemomysl was the third duke of Poland of the Piast dynasty, and the father of Polands first Christian ruler, Mieszko I. He was listed by Gallus Anonymous in his Gesta principum Polonorum and was the son of Lestek, the second known D ...

Morning Star (comics)

This article is about the occultist Morning Star. For the Russian superhero from Marvel Comics, see Morningstar comics. Morning Star is the alias of Schuyler Belial, a fictional Marvel Comics villain and Satanist who was an enemy of Moon Knight a ...

Saikū

Saikū, or Saigu, also known as Itsuki-no-miya, was a village located approximately 10 kilometers north-west of Ise Shrine, arguably the most significant Shinto shrine in Japan. Sometimes referred to as the Bamboo Palace, Saikū served as the palac ...

Nonomiya Shrine

Nonomiya Shrine, or the Shrine in the Country, is a Shinto shrine in the Arashiyama district on the west side of the city of Kyoto in Kyoto prefecture, Japan, close to its bamboo forest. The specific site of the shrine changed somewhat over time, ...

Saiō

A Saiō, also known as Itsuki no Miko, was an unmarried female member of the Japanese Imperial Family, sent to Ise to serve at Ise Grand Shrine from the late 7th century until the 14th century. The Saiōs residence, Saikū, was about 10 km north-wes ...

Saiō Matsuri

The Saiō Matsuri is a 2-day festival held on the first weekend of June in the town of Meiwa, Mie Prefecture in Japan. The Saiō Matsuri celebrates the towns history of once being an Imperial residence. The festival re-enacts the march of the Saiō ...

Princess Sakahito

Princess Sakahito was a Japanese princess, born a daughter of Emperor Kōnin. Her mother was reported to be Princess Inoue - a daughter of Emperor Shōmu, but there is another theory that her mother was Takano no Niigasa. After his father was enthr ...

Ōno-ji

Ōno-ji or Ōno-dera is a temple of the Shingon school of Buddhism, located in the city of Uda, Nara Prefecture, Japan. According to legend and myth, the temple was first opened by En no Gyōja in 681, rendered west entrance to Murō-ji by Kūkai in 8 ...

Yoshimizu Shrine

Yoshimizu Shrine is a Shinto shrine located on Mount Yoshino in Yoshino district, Nara, Japan. It is dedicated to Emperor Go-Daigo, and the samurai Kusunoki Masashige. In 2004, it was designated as part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site under the n ...

Bhagat Bhikhan

Bhagat Bhikhan, a medieval Indian saint two of whose hymns are included in the Guru Granth Sahib. There are in fact two saints of that time sharing the same name - Bhakta Bhikhan and Bhikhan the Sufi. Bhakta Bhikhan was a devotee in the tradition ...

Bhagat Sadhana

Bhagat Sadhna, also called Sadhna Qasai, was a north Indian poet, saint, mystic and one of the devotees whose hymn was incorporated in Guru Granth Sahib. Venerated in the region of Punjab, among Sikhs and Ravidassias, his devotional hymn is widel ...

Jayadeva

Jayadeva, also known as Jaidev, was a Sanskrit poet during the 12th century. He is most known for his epic poem Gita Govinda which concentrates on Krishnas love with the cowherdess, Radha in a rite of spring. This poem, which presents the view th ...

Bhagat Parmanand

Parmanand saint-poet, one of whose hymns is included in the Guru Granth Sahib. Born in Kannauj, Uttarpradesh, in a Brahmin Family in 1483, he is believed to have resided at Kannauj. Parmãnand was a devotee of Vishnu and used in his songs the nom ...