ⓘ Geography of Colorado

                                     

ⓘ Geography of Colorado

The geography of the U.S. State of Colorado is diverse, encompassing both rugged mountainous terrain, vast plains, desert lands, desert canyons, and mesas. In 1861, the United States Congress defined the boundaries of the new Territory of Colorado exclusively by lines of latitude and longitude, stretching from 37°N to 41°N latitude, and from 102°0248"W to 109°0248"W longitude. Starting in 1868, official surveys demarcated the boundaries, deviating from the parallels and meridians in several places. Later surveys attempted to correct some of these mistakes but in 1925 the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed that the earlier demarcation was the official boundary. The borders of Colorado are now officially defined by 697 boundary markers connected by straight boundary lines. Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah are the only states that have their borders defined solely by straight boundary lines with no natural features. The southwest corner of Colorado is the Four Corners Monument at 36°5956"N, 109°243"W. This is the only place in the United States where four states meet: Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah.

On top of mount Elbert 14.440 feet 4.401.2 m in the lake County states highest point and the highest point in the Rocky mountains of North America. Colorado has approximately 550 mountain peaks that exceed a height of 4000 meters. Colorado is the only U.S. state that lies entirely above 1000 meters height. States low altitude 3.317 feet 1.011 m at the point located on the Eastern boundary of Yuma County where the Arikaree river flows into Kansas.