ⓘ Geography of Texas

                                     

ⓘ Geography of Texas

The geography of Texas is diverse and large. Occupying about 7% of the total water land area of the U.S., it is the second largest state after Alaska, and is the southernmost part of the Great Plains, which end in the south against the folded Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico. Texas is in the South Central United States of America, and is considered to form part of the U.S. South and also part of the U.S. Southwest.

The residents of the state, generally divided into North Texas, East Texas, Central Texas, South Texas and sometimes to beg, but according to the Texas almanac, Texas has four major regions: Gulf coastal plains, interior lowlands, Great plains and basin and range province. It was quoted as the difference between the socio-economic geography and physical geography, despite the fact that Texas was granted the prerogative to divide into as many as five US States may be a historical motive for Texans defining their state containing exactly five regions.

Some regions in Texas are more associated with the South-East than South-West, while other regions are more similarities with the southwest, primarily far West Texas and the lower South Texas. The upper sleeve in the opinion of many, have more in common with the plains Midwest than the South or South-West. The size of Texas prohibits easy categorization of the entire state wholly in a region of the United States, and even cultural diversity of the regions of the state make it difficult to treat Texas as a region in its own right.