ⓘ Geography of New York (state)

                                     

ⓘ Geography of New York (state)

The geography of New York state varies widely. Most of New York is dominated by farms, forests, rivers, mountains, and lakes. New Yorks Adirondack Park is larger than any U.S. National Park in the contiguous United States. Niagara Falls, on the Niagara River as it flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, is a popular attraction. The Hudson River begins near Lake Tear of the Clouds and flows south through the eastern part of the state without draining lakes George or Champlain. Lake George empties at its north end into Lake Champlain, whose northern end extends into Canada, where it drains into the Richelieu River and then the St. Lawrence. Four of New York Citys five boroughs are on the three islands at the mouth of the Hudson River: Manhattan Island, Staten Island, and Brooklyn and Queens on Long Island.

"Out of town" is a common term for new York counties North of suburban Westchester, Rockland County and Dutchess County. In upstate new York typically includes the Catskill mountains or areas to the North of the Catskill mountains, the capital district, the Adirondacks, the Erie canal, lake Champlain, lake Otsego, Oneida lake, rivers such as the Delaware, Genesee, Mohawk, and Susquehanna. The highest elevation in new York is Mount Marcy in the Adirondack mountains. New York is the 27th-largest state.